Tag Archives: Julia van Weert

Sungur, H., Yılmaz, N. G., Chan, B. M. C., Muijsenbergh, M. E. T. C. van den, Weert, J. C. M. van, & Schouten, B. C. (2020). Development and Evaluation of a Digital Intervention for Fulfilling the Needs of Older Migrant Patients With Cancer: User-Centered Design Approach. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 22(10), e21238.

Abstract:
Background:
Older migrant patients with cancer face many language- and culture-related barriers to patient participation during medical consultations. To bridge these barriers, an eHealth tool called Health Communicator was developed in the Netherlands. Essentially used as a digital translator that can collect medical history information from patients, the Health Communicator did not include an oncological module so far, despite the fact that the prevalence of Dutch migrant patients with cancer is rising.
Objective:
This study aims to systematically develop, implement, and conduct a pilot evaluation of an oncological module that can be integrated into the Health Communicator to stimulate patient participation among older Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch patients with cancer.
Methods:
The Spiral Technology Action Research model, which incorporates 5 cycles that engage key stakeholders in intervention development, was used as a framework. The listen phase consisted of a needs assessment. The plan phase consisted of developing the content of the oncological module, namely the question prompt lists (QPLs) and scripts for patient education videos. On the basis of pretests in the do phase, 6 audiovisual QPLs on patient rights, treatment, psychosocial support, lifestyle and access to health care services, patient preferences, and clinical trials were created. Additionally, 5 patient education videos were created about patient rights, psychosocial support, clinical trials, and patient-professional communication. In the study phase, the oncological module was pilot-tested among 27 older Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch patients with cancer during their consultations. In the act phase, the oncological model was disseminated to practice.
Results:
The patient rights QPL was chosen most often during the pilot testing in the study phase. Patients and health care professionals perceived the QPLs as easy to understand and useful. There was a negative correlation between the tool’s ease of use and patient age. Patients reported that using the module impacted the consultations positively and thought they were more active compared with previous consultations. Health care professionals also found patients to be more active than usual. Health care professionals asked significantly more questions than patients during consultations. Patients requested to see the patients’ rights video most often. Patients rated the videos as easy to understand, useful, and informative. Most of the patients wanted to use the tool in the future.
Conclusions:
Older migrant patients with cancer, survivors, and health care professionals found the oncological module to be a useful tool and have shown intentions to incorporate it into future consultation sessions. Both QPLs and videos were evaluated positively, the latter indicating that the use of narratives to inform older, low-literate migrant patients with cancer about health-related topics in their mother tongue is a viable approach to increase the effectiveness of health care communication with this target group.

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Van der Goot, M. J., Bol, N., & Van Weert, J. C. M. (2020). Age differences in preferences for emotionally-meaningful versus knowledge-related appeals. Communications: The European Journal of Communication Research. Advance online publication. doi:10.1515/commun-2019-0108

Abstract: 

Socioemotional selectivity theory (SST), an influential life-span theory, suggests that older adults prefer persuasive messages that appeal to emotionally-meaningful goals over messages that appeal to knowledge-related goals, whereas younger adults do not show this preference. A mixed-factorial experiment was conducted to test whether older adults (≥65 years) differ from younger adults (25–45 years) in their preference for emotionally-meaningful appeals over knowledge-related appeals, when appeals are clearly developed in line with SST. For older adults we found the expected preference for emotionally-meaningful appeals for cancer centers but not for grocery stores and travel organizations. As expected, in most cases, younger adults did not show a preference. Implications for SST-based communication research and for practice are discussed.

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Altendorf, M.B., van Weert, J.C.M., Hoving, C., Smit, E.S. (2019). Should or could? Testing the use of autonomy-supportive language and the provision of choice in online computer-tailored alcohol reduction communication, Digital Health, 5, 1-15, DOI: 10.1177/2055207619832767

Abstract:

Individuals can feel more motivated to change health behaviour when perceiving autonomy-support, as induced through non-pressuring message phrasing and the provision of choice: autonomy-supportive message framing. Additionally, controlling message phrasing – commands that do not provide choice – can thwart autonomy and lead to reactance, which is detrimental to the persuasiveness of health messages. Many health messages have not been formulated in an autonomy-supportive manner and therefore could arouse reactance, resulting in reduced intervention effectiveness. We aimed to test the effects of autonomy-supportive vs. controlling alcohol reduction message frames on individuals’ perceived autonomy-support from these messages; and their reactance towards the message while considering the individual need for autonomy in the context of an online computer-tailored alcohol reduction intervention. A 2 (autonomy-supportive language vs. controlling language) × 2 (choice vs. no choice) between-subjects experiment (N = 521) was conducted using an online computer-tailored alcohol reduction intervention. Outcome measures were perceived autonomy-support and reactance and we investigated whether an individual’s need for autonomy moderated the effect of autonomy-supportive and controlling message frames on those outcome variables. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that neither autonomy-supportive nor controlling message frames had significant effects on perceived autonomy-support or reactance, and there was no moderation from the need for autonomy. Overall, participants evaluated the intervention as positive and perceived high levels of autonomy-support, regardless of the message frame used. Future research needs to test whether the positive intervention evaluation is due to content tailoring, and whether more distinguishable manipulations of message frames could be effective.

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Altendorf, M.B., Hoving, C., van Weert J.C.M., Smit, E.S. (2020). Effectiveness of Message Frame-Tailoring in a Web-based Smoking Cessation Program: Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 22(4):e17251.

Abstract:

Background: The content of online computer-tailored interventions is often determined to match an individual’s characteristics, beliefs, and behavioral factors. These content-tailored interventions lead to better message processing and a higher likelihood of behavior change such as smoking cessation. However, a meta-analysis of online computer-tailored interventions showed that effect sizes, albeit positive, remain small, suggesting room for improvement. A promising strategy to enhance the effectiveness of online computer-tailored interventions is to tailor the message frame (ie, how a message is communicated) based on the preferred communication style of the user in addition to content-tailoring. One factor that determines an individual’s communication style preference is the need for autonomy; some individuals prefer an autonomy-supportive communication style (offering choice and use of suggestive language), whereas others might prefer a directive communication style, which is replete with imperatives and does not provide choice. Tailoring how messages are presented (eg, based on the need for autonomy) is called message frame-tailoring.

Objective: The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of message frame-tailoring based on the need for autonomy, in isolation and in combination with content-tailoring, within the context of an online computer-tailored smoking cessation intervention. The primary outcome measure was the 7-day point-prevalence of smoking abstinence. Secondary outcomes were perceived message relevance, self-determined motivation to quit smoking, and sociocognitive beliefs.

Methods: A randomized controlled trial with a 2 (message frame-tailoring vs no message frame-tailoring) by 2 (content-tailoring vs no content-tailoring) design was conducted among adult smokers intending to quit smoking (N=273).

Results: Structural equation modeling revealed that the content-tailored condition increased smoking abstinence rates 1 month after the start of the intervention (beta=.57, P=.02). However, neither message frame-tailoring nor its interaction with content-tailoring significantly predicted smoking abstinence. In our model, message frame-tailoring, content-tailoring, as well as their interaction significantly predicted perceived relevance of the smoking cessation messages, which consequently predicted self-determined motivation. In turn, self-determined motivation positively affected attitudes and self-efficacy for smoking cessation, but only self-efficacy consequently predicted smoking abstinence. Participants in the control condition perceived the highest level of message relevance (mean 4.78, SD 1.27). However, messages that were frame-tailored for individuals with a high need for autonomy in combination with content-tailored messages led to significantly higher levels of perceived message relevance (mean 4.83, SD 1.03) compared to those receiving content-tailored messages only (mean 4.24, SD 1.05, P=.003).

Conclusions: Message frame-tailoring based on the need for autonomy seems to be an effective addition to conventional content-tailoring techniques in online smoking cessation interventions for people with a high need for autonomy; however, this is not effective in its current form for people with a low need for autonomy.

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Linn, A. J., van der Goot, M. J., Brandes, K., van Weert, J. C. M., & Smit, E. G. (2019). Cancer Patients’ Needs for Support in Expressing Instrumental Concerns and Emotions. European Journal of Cancer Care, ecc.13138.

Abstract:
Introduction
The aim of our study was to provide an overview of intervention guidelines on how to address patients’ practical needs for support in expressing instrumental concerns and emotions regarding medical, psychosocial and practical topics.
Methods
Six focus groups of cancer patients and survivors (N = 39) were organised. An interview guide was created that consisted of three topics: (a) concerns, (b) needs for support, and (c) a Concern Prompt List. Using the framework method, the transcripts were coded and analysed in Atlas T.I.
Results
Patients prefer to receive practical and emotional support, help with preparation, prompts/cues, instructions on how to perform the behaviour (i.e., express their concerns or emotions), feedback, a different structure for the consultation and tailoring. Most of these techniques should preferably be delivered via interpersonal communication. Needs sometimes differ for instrumental concerns and emotions. Only some needs for support were exclusively related to instrumental concerns or emotions. The typical needs for support were not solely linked to the medical, psychosocial and practical topics.
Conclusion
Different needs to express instrumental concerns and emotions throughout the disease trajectory are categorised. These needs provide input for developing interventions to support concern expression.

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Julia van Weert wins 2018 Lewis Donohew Outstanding Scholar in Health Communication Award

Professor Julia van Weert will be awarded the Lewis Donohew Outstanding Health Communication Scholar Award during the 2018 Kentucky Conference on Health Communication (KCHC).The award was established in Dr. Donohew’s name in 1998 to recognize outstanding research contributions to the health communication field made during the biennium preceding each conference. The list of award recipients includes some of the most highly funded and recognized communication scholars in the world. Van Weert is the first non-American to obtain it. Continue reading >>

Van der Goot, M.J., Bol, N., & Van Weert, J.C.M. (2019). Translating socioemotional selectivity theory into persuasive communication: Conceptualizing and operationalizing emotionally-meaningful versus knowledge-related appeals. International Journal of Communication, 13, 1416-1437.

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Diviani, N., Van den Putte, B., Meppelink, C.S., & Van Weert, J.C.M. (2016). Exploring the role of health literacy in the evaluation of online health information: Insights from a mixed-methods study. Patient Education & Counseling. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/10810730.2015.1080327

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Yılmaz, N. G., Schouten, B. C., Schinkel, S., & van Weert, J. C. Information and participation preferences and needs of non-Western ethnic minority cancer patients and survivors: A systematic review of the literature. Patient education and counseling. Advance online publication

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Schinkel, S., Schouten, B. C., Kerpiclik, F., Van Den Putte, B., & Van Weert, J. C. (2018). Perceptions of Barriers to Patient Participation: Are They Due to Language, Culture, or Discrimination? Health communication, 24, 1-13.

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prof. dr. Julia van Weert

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Meppelink, C. S., Van Weert, J. C. M., Brosius, A., & Smit, E. G. (2017). Dutch health websites and their ability to inform people with low health literacy. Patient Education and Counseling. Advance online publication. doi:10.1016/j.pec.2017.06.012

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The role of health literacy in the evaluation of online health information

Consumers of online health information often do not question the quality of what they find online and tend to evaluate the information based on criteria not recognized by existing web quality guidelines. People with low health literacy, in particular, use less established criteria and rely more heavily on non-established ones compared to those with high health literacy.  Continue reading >>

Zendedel, R., Schouten, B.C., Van Weert, J.C.M., & Van den Putte, B. (2016). Informal interpreting in general practice: The migrant patient’s voice. Ethnicity and Health. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/13557858.2016.1246939

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Eline and Julia received grant from Dutch Cancer Society

On Christmas Eve, Eline and Julia received some good news: together with a colleague from Maastricht University, they were awarded a grant from the Dutch Cancer Society for a three-year PhD-project on the  effectiveness of message frame tailoring in online smoking cessation communication. Continue reading >>

Oratie Julia: Online en offline communicatie met kwetsbare patiënten

Hoe kunnen online en offline communicatie ingezet worden voor kwetsbare patiënten? Julia van Weert stelt in haar oratie dat nieuwe technologieën, als aanvulling op de communicatie in de spreekkamer, een meerwaarde kunnen hebben. De mogelijkheden worden volgens haar echter nog bij lange na niet optimaal benut. Continue reading >>

Boersma, P., Van Weert, J.C.M., Van Meijel, B., & Dröes, R.M. (2017). Implementation of the Veder Contact Method in daily nursing home care for people with dementia: a process analysis according to the RE-AIM framework. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 26, 436-455. doi: 10.1111/jocn.13432

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Boersma, P., Van Weert, J.C.M., Van Meijel, B., Van de Ven, P.M., & Dröes, R.M. (2017). Study protocol Implementation of the Veder contact method (VCM) in daily nursing home care for people with dementia: an evaluation based on the RE-AIM framework. Aging & Mental Health, 21, 730-741. doi: 10.1080/13607863.2016.1154015

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Brandes, K., Van der Goot, M.J., Smit, E.G., Van Weert, J.C.M., & Linn, A.J. (2017). Understanding the interplay of cancer patients’ instrumental concerns and emotions. Patient Education and Counseling, 100, 839-845. doi:10.1016/j.pec.2017.02.002

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Brandes, K., & Van Weert, J.C.M. (2017). Implementing consultation audio-recordings and question prompt lists into routine cancer care: How can we address healthcare providers’ barriers? Patient Education and Counseling, 100, 1029-1030 (editorial). doi:10.1016/j.pec.2017.02.002

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Julia van Weert, professor of Health Communication

Dr J.C.M. van Weert (1962) has been named professor of Health Communication at the University of Amsterdam’s (UvA) Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences effective 1 april 2015. Continue reading >>

Julia van Weert wins International Award

Julia van Weert received the Jozien Bensing Award by the European Association of Communication in Healthcare (EACH) for outstanding research in health communication.  Continue reading >>

Nguyen, M. H., Van Weert, J. C. M., Bol, N., Loos, E. F., Tytgat, K. M. A. J., Van De Ven, A. W. H., & Smets, E. M A. (2017). Tailoring the mode of information presentation: Effects on younger and older adults’ attention and recall of online information. Human Communication Research, 43(1), 102-126. doi:10.1111/hcre.12097

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Research project Julia van Weert financially supported by KWF Kankerbestrijding

The OncoCommunicAging (OCA) research line, lead by ASCoR researcher Julia van Weert, received a 286,000 euro grant from KWF Kankerbestrijding (the Dutch Cancer Society) on a project called “How to effectively tailor website information to older cancer patients’ mode preferences: A Randomized Controlled Trial”. Continue reading >>

Van Dulmen, S., Driesenaar, J.A., Van Weert, J.C.M., Van Osch, M., & Noordman, J. (2017). PatientVOICE: Development of a preparatory, pre-chemotherapy online communication tool for older patients with cancer. JMIR Research Protocols, 6, e85. doi:10.2196/resprot.6979

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Bol, N., Van Weert, J. C. M., Loos, E. F., Romano Bergstrom, J. C., Bolle, S., & Smets, E. M. A. (2016). How are online health messages processed? Using eye tracking to predict recall of information in younger and older adults. Journal of Health Communication, 21(4), 387–396. doi:10.1080/10810730.2015.1080327

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Bolle, S., Romijn, G., Smets, E. M. A., Loos, E. F., Kunneman, M., & Van Weert, J. C. M. (2016). Older cancer patients’ user experiences with web-based health information tools: A think-aloud study. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 18(7), e208. doi: 10.2196/jmir.5618

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Brandes, K., Linn, A.J., Smit, E.G., & Van Weert, J.C.M. (2016). Unraveling the determinants of cancer patients’ concern expression. Journal of Health Communication, 21(3), 327-336. doi: 10.1080/10810730.2015.1080325

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Diviani, N., Van den Putte, B., Meppelink, C. S., & Van Weert, J. C. M. (2016). Exploring the role of health literacy in the evaluation of online health information: Insights from a mixed-methods study. Patient Education and Counseling, 99(6), 1017–1025. doi:10.1016/j.pec.2016.01.007

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Hillen, M.A., De Haes, H.C.J.M., Van Tienhoven, G., Van Laarhoven, H.W.M., Van Weert, J.C.M., Vermeulen, D.M., & Smets, E.M.A. (2016). Oncologists’ nonverbal behavior and analogue patients’ recall of information. Acta Oncologica, 55(6), 671-679. doi: 10.3109/0284186X.2015.1120884

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Meppelink, C. S., Smit, E. G., Diviani, N., & Van Weert, J. C. M. (2016). Health literacy and online health information processing: Unraveling the underlying mechanisms. Journal of Health Communication, 21(Suppl. 2), 109–120. doi:10.1080/10810730.2016.1193920

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Schinkel, S., Schouten, B. C., Street, R. L., Van den Putte, B., & Van Weert, J. C. M. (2016). Enhancing health communication outcomes among ethnic minority patients: The effects of the match between participation preferences and perceptions and doctor–patient concordance. Journal of Health Communication, 21(12), 1251–1259. doi:10.1080/10810730.2016.1240269

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Van Weert, J. C. M., Van Munster, B. C., Sanders, R., Spijker, R., Hooft, L., & Jansen, J. (2016). Decision aids to help older people make health decisions: A systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, 16(1). doi:10.1186/s12911-016-0281-8

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Zendedel, R., Schouten, B. C., Van Weert, J. C. M., & Van den Putte, B. (2016). Informal interpreting in general practice: Comparing the perspectives of general practitioners, migrant patients and family interpreters. Patient Education and Counseling, 99(6), 981–987. doi:10.1016/j.pec.2015.12.021

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Boersma, P., Van Weert, J. C. M., Lakerveld, J., & Dröes, R. M. (2015). The art of successful implementation of psychosocial interventions in residential dementia care: A systematic review of the literature based on the RE-AIM framework. International Psychogeriatrics, 27(1), 19-35. doi: 10.1017/S1041610214001409

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Bol, N., Smets, E. M. A., Eddes, E. H., De Haes, H. C. J. M., Loos, E. F., & Van Weert, J. C. M. (2015). Illustrations enhance older colorectal cancer patients’ website satisfaction and recall of online cancer information. European Journal of Cancer Care, 24(2), 213-223. doi:10.1111/ecc.12283

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Bol, N., Van Weert, J. C. M., De Haes, J. C. J. M., Loos, E. F., & Smets, E. M. A. (2015). The effect of modality and narration style on recall of online health information: Results from a web-based experiment. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 17(4), e104. doi:10.2196/jmir.4164

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Bolle, S., Van Weert, J. C. M., Daams, J. G., Loos, E. F., De Haes, J. C. J. M., & Smets, E. M. A. (2015). Online health information tool effectiveness for older patients: A systematic review of the literature. Journal of Health Communication, 20(9), 1067-1083. doi:10.1080/10810730.2015.1018637

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Bolle, S., Van Weert, J. C. M., Smets, E. M. A., & Loos, E. F. (2015). Lack of development and usability descriptions in evaluation reports on online health information tools for older patients. In J. Zhou & G. Salvendy (Eds.), Human aspects of IT for the aged population. Proceedings HCII 2015, Part II, LNCS 9194 (pp. 27-38). Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.

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Brandes, K., Linn, A. J., Butow, P. N., & Van Weert, J. C. M. (2015). The characteristics and effectiveness of Question Prompt List interventions in oncology: A systematic review of the literature. Psycho-Oncology, 24(3), 245-252. doi: 10.1002/pon.3637

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