Tag Archives: Bas van den Putte

Mesman, M., Hendriks, H., Onrust, S., Neijens, P., & van den Putte, B. (2020). The antecedents and consequences of interpersonal communication during a school-based health intervention. Health Communication, 1-11.

Abstract:

School-based health interventions often have limited and inconsistent effects. Although interpersonal communication likely is important, hardly any studies have investigated interpersonal communication of students with their friends, classmates, and parents about the health programs and health behaviors in school-based health interventions. In a two-wave prospective study of 389 adolescents focusing on three health behaviors (i.e., alcohol use, snack intake, and exercise), we addressed two aims. Our first aim was to investigate how student evaluations of a school-based health intervention influenced interpersonal communication about health behaviors (i.e., valence and frequency of conversations). Findings showed that positively evaluating a school-based health intervention increased how often students talked about the intervention with friends, classmates, and parents, as well as how they discussed the three health behaviors. Our second aim was to investigate the influence of interpersonal communication with friends, classmates, and parents on predictors of health behaviors. We found for conversational frequency that frequently discussing health behaviors resulted in healthier (more positive) predictors of exercise, but also in unhealthier (more positive) predictors of snacking and drinking. Furthermore, findings showed that positively discussing exercising, and negatively discussing snacking and drinking, resulted in healthier predictors of these behaviors. Our findings show that it is important to understand the impact of post-intervention communication and that post-intervention communication with peers and parents about health behaviors are predictors of health behavior.

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Mesman M, Onrust S, Verkerk R, Hendriks H, Van den Putte B. (2020). Effectiveness of the InCharge Prevention Program to Promote Healthier Lifestyles: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial. JMIR Research Protocols, 9(7), e17702.

Abstract:

Background: InCharge is a newly developed school-based health intervention aimed at older adolescents. It aims to promote a healthier lifestyle by increasing self-regulation skills. After the InCharge program’s effectiveness was previously investigated in a pilot study, the content of the program was adapted.

Objective: This study describes the protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial that aims to investigate the effectiveness of the InCharge program.

Methods: A cluster randomized controlled trial including 70 classes with older adolescents (aged 16 years or older) in the Netherlands will be conducted to test the effectiveness of the InCharge program. After schools are recruited, randomization occurs at the class level. The trial consists of the following two conditions: an experimental condition and a control condition. Participants in the experimental condition will be given the InCharge intervention, consisting of four lessons of 50 minutes, with each lesson containing three assignments of approximately 15 minutes. While participants in the experimental condition will receive InCharge, participants in the control condition will receive regular academic school courses. Surveys are administered 1 week before the intervention (baseline), 1 week after the intervention (posttest), and 12 weeks after the intervention (follow-up). Variables of interest include, but are not limited to, self-regulation; predictors of snack intake, physical activity, and alcohol use; and interpersonal communication regarding these health behaviors. In addition to surveys, observations will be conducted during the first and fourth lessons, teachers will be interviewed, and focus groups will be held with a selection of students from the intervention condition.

Results: Enrollment started in September 2017. As of June 2019, a total of 1216 participants were enrolled for this trial. Findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at conferences. The trial has been approved by the Ethics Review Board of the Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences of the University of Amsterdam (reference no.: 2017-PC-8244).

Conclusions: In this study protocol, the design of a cluster randomized controlled trial is described, which assesses how effectively the school-based intervention InCharge stimulates healthier lifestyles in late adolescents. We hypothesize that participants in the experimental condition will consume less alcohol, eat fewer unhealthy snacks, and be more physically active compared with participants in the control condition.

Trial registration: Netherlands Trial Register (NL6654); https://www.trialregister.nl/trial/6654.

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Mesman, M., Hendriks, H., & van den Putte, B. (2020). How viewing alcohol posts of friends on social networking sites influences predictors of alcohol use. Journal of Health Communication, 25(6), 522-529.

Abstract:

Young adults are frequently exposed to alcohol posts from their friends on social networking sites, and little research has investigated the influences of these posts on alcohol use. Therefore, this study investigated how exposure to alcohol posts influenced determinants of alcohol use, and whether alcohol posts of close friends influenced these determinants more strongly compared to alcohol posts of distant friends. Students from Dutch universities (N = 210) participated in an experiment with a 2 (post condition: alcohol or neutral) x 2 (friend condition: close or distant) between-subjects design. Participants that were exposed to alcohol posts reported higher intention to use alcohol, F(1, 204) = 4.32, p =.039, willingness to use alcohol, F(1, 204) = 8.15, p =.005, and more positive affective attitudes about alcohol, F(1, 204) = 5.84, p =.017, than participants that were exposed to neutral posts. Additionally, participants who viewed alcohol posts of close friends reported more positive affective attitudes about alcohol compared to participants who viewed alcohol posts of distant friends, F(1, 204) = 5.15, p =.024. Developers of health interventions could use these findings to raise awareness about the unhealthy influences of alcohol posts on determinants of young adults’ alcohol use.

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Grant from Lung Foundation for Bas van den Putte

Bas van den Putte is involved in two projects that recently have been funded by a grant provided by Longfonds, Hartstichting, KWF, Trombosestichting and Diabetesfonds. General objective of both projects is to conduct research that contributes to policy that discourages tobacco use and stimulates the smoke-free generation.

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Alblas, M. C., Mollen, S., Fransen, M. L., & van den Putte, B. (2020). Food at first sight: Visual attention to palatable food cues on TV and subsequent unhealthy food intake in unsuccessful restrained eaters. Appetite, 147, [104574]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2019.104574

Abstract:

Background

This study investigated whether unsuccessful dieters show heightened visual attention to food cues in TV content and how visual attention influences subsequent unhealthy food intake. This study adds to prior literature by investigating the influence of visual attention to food cues on food intake with actual media content (i.e., instead of isolated food cues such as pictures or words) and by differentiating between chronic dieters (i.e., restrained eaters) who vary in dieting success (i.e., perceived self-regulatory success [PSRS]). To get a more detailed insight into different processes of visual attention, two measures of attention (i.e., initial orientation and attention duration) were examined.

Methods

Unrestrained (n = 34) and restrained eaters (n = 28) varying in PSRS watched a talk show containing subtly depicted, palatable food cues. While watching, their visual attention to the food cues was measured with an eye-tracker. Unhealthy food intake was assessed afterwards in a taste test.

Results

A two-way interaction between eating restraint and PSRS on initial visual orientation was found: unsuccessful restrained eaters’ initial orientation to food cues was faster compared to that of successful restrained eaters. There were no significant findings on attention duration. Furthermore, visual attention did not predict unhealthy food intake.

Discussion

Unsuccessful restrained eaters’ fast initial orientation, but no longer attention duration, suggests that self-regulation may be important at early stages of visual attention. Future research on this topic should continue to differentiate between initial orientation and attention duration, as well as between more and less successful restrained eaters. The lack of findings on unhealthy food intake suggest that food cues embedded in actual media content might have less influence on eating behavior compared to isolated food cues.

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Alblas, M. C., Mollen, S., Fransen, M. L., & van den Putte, B. (2019). Watch what you watch: The effect of exposure to food-related television content on the accessibility of a hedonic eating goal. Appetite, 134, 204-211. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2018.11.034

Abstract:

Background

This study examined whether seeing food-related TV content affected the accessibility of a hedonic eating goal differently for people scoring relatively high or low on chronic dieting (i.e., eating restraint) and perceived self-regulatory success (i.e., PSRS).

Methods

Three between-subjects experiments were conducted in which participants were exposed to food-related or non-food related TV content. In Experiment 1 (student sample, N = 111) and Experiment 2 (community sample, N = 69) participants watched TV commercials for food or non-food products and in Experiment 3 (student sample, N = 102) a cooking show or a non-food TV show. Hedonic eating goal accessibility was assessed by means of a lexical decision task (LDT). Eating restraint and PSRS were measured afterwards.

Results

The expected three-way interaction between TV content, eating restraint, and PSRS on hedonic eating goal accessibility was not found in Experiments 1 and 2. In Experiment 3, a three-way interaction was found although effects were short-lived. As expected, watching food-related versus non-food related TV content resulted in more hedonic eating goal accessibility among people relatively high in eating restraint but low in PSRS (i.e., unsuccessful restrained eaters), but in less accessibility among participants relatively high in both eating restraint and PSRS (i.e., successful restrained eaters).

Discussion

As effects were found after watching a cooking show (Experiment 3) but not after watching TV commercials (Experiments 1 and 2), future research should explore whether the type of TV content might play a role in the effects of food-related TV content on hedonic eating goal accessibility, as well as whether the effects found on goal accessibility translate into actual food choices.

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Boers, E., Hendriks, H., Van den Putte, B., & Beentjes, H. (2018). Vocational Community College Students’ Conversations about Binge Drinking. Journal of health communication, 23(12), 1072-1076.

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Boers, E., Zebregs, S., Hendriks, H., & van den Putte, B. (2018). Is it feeling or thinking? The influence of affective and cognitive attitude on adolescents’ intention to engage in binge drinking. Journal of Health Communication, 23, 430-434.

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Hendriks, H., van den Putte, B, & Gebhardt, W. A. (2018). Alcoholposts on Social Networking Sites: the Alcoholpost-Typology (APT). Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 21, 463-467.

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Hendriks, H., Gebhardt, W. A., van den Putte, B, & Moreno, M. (2018). Social drinking on social media: A content analysis of the social aspects of alcohol-related posts on Facebook and Instagram. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 20(6), e226.

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Diviani, N., Van den Putte, B., Meppelink, C.S., & Van Weert, J.C.M. (2016). Exploring the role of health literacy in the evaluation of online health information: Insights from a mixed-methods study. Patient Education & Counseling. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/10810730.2015.1080327

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Schinkel, S., Schouten, B. C., Kerpiclik, F., Van Den Putte, B., & Van Weert, J. C. (2018). Perceptions of Barriers to Patient Participation: Are They Due to Language, Culture, or Discrimination? Health communication, 24, 1-13.

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Hendriks, H., Van den Putte, B., De Bruijn, G.-J., & De Vreese, C. H. (2011). Talk about alcohol use: The role of interpersonal communication within health campaign effects. Psychology & Health, 26, 263. (Abstract)

prof. dr. Bas van den Putte

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Hummel, K., Candel, M. J. J. M., Nagelhout, G. E., Brown, J., Van den Putte, B., Kotz, D., … de Vries, H. (2017). Construct and predictive validity of three measures of intention to quit smoking: Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Netherlands Survey. Nicotine & Tobacco Research. Advance online publication. doi:10.1093/ntr/ntx092

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The role of health literacy in the evaluation of online health information

Consumers of online health information often do not question the quality of what they find online and tend to evaluate the information based on criteria not recognized by existing web quality guidelines. People with low health literacy, in particular, use less established criteria and rely more heavily on non-established ones compared to those with high health literacy.  Continue reading >>

Zendedel, R., Schouten, B.C., Van Weert, J.C.M., & Van den Putte, B. (2016). Informal interpreting in general practice: The migrant patient’s voice. Ethnicity and Health. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/13557858.2016.1246939

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De Graaf, A., Van den Putte, B., Nguyen, M.-H., Zebregs, S., Lammers, J., & Neijens, P. (2017). The effectiveness of narrative versus informational smoking education on smoking beliefs, attitudes and intentions of low-educated adolescents. Psychology & Health, 32(7), 810–825. doi:10.1080/08870446.2017.1307371

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Hendriks, H., Gebhardt, W. A., & Van den Putte, B. (2017). Alcohol-related posts from young people on social networking sites: Content and motivations. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 20(7), 428–435. doi:10.1089/cyber.2016.0640

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Meijer, E., Van Laar, C., Gebhardt, W. A., Fokkema, M., Van den Putte, B., Dijkstra, A., … Willemsen, M. C. (2017). Identity change among smokers and ex-smokers: Findings from the ITC Netherlands Survey. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 31(4), 465–478. doi:10.1037/adb0000281

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Mollen, S., Engelen, S., Kessels, L. T. E., & Van den Putte, B. (2017). Short and sweet: The persuasive effects of message framing and temporal context in antismoking warning labels. Journal of Health Communication, 22(1), 20-28. doi: 10.1080/10810730.2016.1247484

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Schreuders, M., Nuyts, P., Van den Putte, B., & Kunst, A. (2017). Understanding the impact of school tobacco policies on adolescent smoking behaviour: a realist review. Tobacco Prevention & Cessation, 3(May Supplement). doi:10.18332/tpc/70595

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Smit, E. S., Dima, A. L., Immerzeel, S. A. M., Van den Putte, B., & Williams, G. C. (2017). The Virtual Care Climate Questionnaire: Development and validation of a questionnaire measuring perceived support for autonomy in a virtual care setting. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 19(5), e155. doi:10.2196/jmir.6714

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De Graaf, A., Van den Putte, B., Zebregs, S., Lammers, J., & Neijens, P. (2016). Smoking education for low-educated adolescents: Comparing print and audiovisual messages. Health Promotion Practice, 17(6), 853-861. doi: 10.1177/1524839916660525

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Diviani, N., Van den Putte, B., Meppelink, C. S., & Van Weert, J. C. M. (2016). Exploring the role of health literacy in the evaluation of online health information: Insights from a mixed-methods study. Patient Education and Counseling, 99(6), 1017–1025. doi:10.1016/j.pec.2016.01.007

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Hendriks, H., De Bruijn, G.-J, Meehan, O., & Van den Putte, B. (2016). Online and offline conversations about alcohol: Comparing the effects of familiar and unfamiliar discussion partners. Journal of Health Communication, 21(7), 734-742. doi:10.1080/10810730.2016.1153766

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Leeuwen, L., van den Putte, B., Renes, R. J., Leeuwis, C. (2016). Do narrative engagement and audience members’ thoughts explain the effects of an entertainment-education narrative on discouraging binge drinking?
 Media Psychology, 20(2), 194–220. doi: 10.1080/15213269.2016.1142379

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Maslowska, E., Smit, E.G., & Van den Putte, B. (2016). It’s all in the name: A study of consumers’responses to personalized marketing communication. Journal of Interactive Advertising, 16(1), 74-85. doi: 10.1080/15252019.2016.1161568

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Nagelhout, G. E., Heijndijk, S. M., Cummings, K. M.., Willemsen, M. C. Van den Putte, B., Heckman, … Borland, R. (2016). E-cigarette advertisements, and associations with the use of e-cigarettes and disapproval or quitting of smoking: Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Netherlands Survey. International Journal of Drug Policy, 29, 73-79. doi: 10.1016/j.drugpo.2015.12.015

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Nagelhout, G., Willemsen, M. C., De Vries, H., Mons, U., Hitchman, S. C., Kunst, A. E., … Thrasher, J. F. (2016). Educational differences in the impact of pictorial cigarette warning labels on smokers. Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys. Tobacco Control, 25(3), 325-332. doi: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2014-051971

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Schinkel, S., Schouten, B. C., Street, R. L., Van den Putte, B., & Van Weert, J. C. M. (2016). Enhancing health communication outcomes among ethnic minority patients: The effects of the match between participation preferences and perceptions and doctor–patient concordance. Journal of Health Communication, 21(12), 1251–1259. doi:10.1080/10810730.2016.1240269

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Van ’t Riet, J., Cox, A. D., Cox, D., Zimet, G. D., De Bruijn, G.-J., Van den Putte, B., … Ruiter, R. A. C. (2016). Does perceived risk influence the effects of message framing? Revisiting the link between prospect theory and message framing? Health Psychology Review, 10(4), 447-459. doi: 10.1080/17437199.2016.1176865

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Zendedel, R., Schouten, B. C., Van Weert, J. C. M., & Van den Putte, B. (2016). Informal interpreting in general practice: Comparing the perspectives of general practitioners, migrant patients and family interpreters. Patient Education and Counseling, 99(6), 981–987. doi:10.1016/j.pec.2015.12.021

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Zethof, D., Nagelhout, G. E., De Rooij, M., Driezen, P., Fong, G. F., Van den Putte, B., … Willemsen, M. C. (2016). Attrition analysed in five waves of a longitudinal yearly survey of smokers: Findings from the ITC Netherlands Survey. European Journal of Public Health, 26(4), 693-699. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw037

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Brown, A. K., Nagelhout, G. E., Van den Putte, B., Willemsen, M. C., Mons, U., Guignard, R., & Thompson, M. E. (2015). Trends and socioeconomic differences in roll-your-own tobacco use: Findings from the ITC Europe Surveys. Tobacco Control, 24(Suppl. 3), 11-16.
doi: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2014-051986

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De Graaf, A., Van den Putte, B., & De Bruijn, G.-J. (2015). Effects of issue involvement and framing of a responsible drinking message on attitudes, intentions, and behavior. Journal of Health Communication, 20(8), 989-994.
doi: 10.1080/10810730.2015.1018623

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Diviani, N., van den Putte, B., Giani, S., & van Weert, J. C. M. (2015). Low Health Literacy and Evaluation of Online Health Information: A Systematic Review of the Literature, Journal of Medical Internet Research, 17(5), e112, doi: 10.2196/jmir.4018.

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Hendriks, H., Van den Putte, B., & De Bruijn, G.-J. (2015). Subjective reality: The influence of perceived and objective conversational valence on binge drinking determinants. Journal of Health Communication, 20(7), 859-866. doi:10.1080/10810730.2015.1018570

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Hummel, K., Hoving, C.,Nagelhout, G. E., De Vries, H.,Van den Putte, B., Candel, M. J. M. M, … Willemsen, M. C. (2015). Prevalence and reasons for use of electronic cigarettes among smokers: Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Netherlands Survey. International Journal of Drug Policy, 26(6), 601-608. doi:10.1016/j.drugpo.2014.12.009

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Hummel, K., Nagelhout, G. E., Willemsen, M. C., Driezen, P., Springvloet, L., Mons, U., … De Vries, H. (2015). Trends and socioeconomic differences in policy triggers for thinking about quitting smoking. Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys. Drug and Alcohol Depencence, 155, 154-162. doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.07.678

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